Course Descriptions

Classical Rhetoric: Lost Tools of Writing I

with Jacob Douvier, Julie Flick, Cheryl Floyd, April Langan, & Cyndi McCallister

This classical writing program teaches students more than the basic of composition. It also challenges and teaches them to think. By employing the three canons of classical rhetoric - invention, arrangement, and elocution - LTW reveals how to solve the three problems all writers face, cultivates deeper thinking, and provides a solid foundation for future learning. Its step-by-step instruction makes writing manageable even for students who lack experience or confidence in writing and its lessons in thinking, organizing, and expression will challenge and delight even experienced and eager writers.

Suggested Age/Background: 12 or with instructor and/or headmaster permission


Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the fall semester.
 In order to be accepted into the spring semester class, students must complete the fall semester or equivalent work in Lost Tools of Writing program.

Required Text: The Lost Tools of Writing, 5th Edition, Student Workbook, published by the CiRCE Institute



Level I & J. R. R. Tolkien with Julie Flick, Mondays at 10am EST
The Lost Tools of Writing is a high school-level classical rhetoric curriculum that teaches the persuasive essay. But it is more than a writing program; it is at heart a thinking program. Students learn to ask questions using the common topics to help them gather and arrange ideas and information from which they are able to derive and express theses and supporting points. These skills can be applied to every other kind of writing (and decision-making) they'll ever have to do!

Over the course of the year, Level One students build on the simple structure of a *very* rudimentary Essay One and add new elements to each subsequent one. The foundational rhetorical canons of Invention, Arrangement, and Elocution are practiced together through lively class discussion and written exercises and then incorporated into each essay.

Along the way, we’ll be reading, discussing, and relishing The Hobbit and The Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien, as well as two of Tolkien’s short stories and some fairy tales by George MacDonald and the Brothers Grimm. We’ll discover the questions we ask to gather ideas for essays based on these works will help us be not only better writers, but more attentive and engaged readers as well.

This classical writing program teaches students more than the basic of composition. It also challenges and teaches them to think. By employing the three canons of classical rhetoric - invention, arrangement, and elocution - LTW reveals how to solve the three problems all writers face, cultivates deeper thinking, and provides a solid foundation for future learning. Its step-by-step instruction makes writing manageable even for students who lack experience or confidence in writing and its lessons in thinking, organizing, and expression will challenge and delight even experienced and eager writers.
Additional Required Text: ISBN TBA
Registration numbers: Min. MET, Max. 14

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Level I Advanced & Lit of Choice with Cyndi McCallister, Mondays at 11am EST
In this course, students will work through an advanced review of LTW Level I in the first semester and work through the new LTW Comparison essay program in the second semester.
Students can write their essays, both Level I and Comparison using the literature of their choice. Stories from the Tales of Wonder Volume 2 will be used for discussions during class.

For students who have completed LTW Level I at home, in a different school, or Online with us, this course will serve as a review of the whole program and introduce the comparison essay. While focusing on the second half of the program's essays, these students will gain added practice with the tools that are practiced the least, the tools taught in the second semester. Here we will work closely with Circumstance, Relation, and Testimony; Refutation and Narratio; and Simile, Alliteration, Metaphor, and Assonance. Although Essays Five to Nine will be the focus, the whole tool box will be explored and reinforced during the 1st semester. During the 2nd semester we will explore the newly developed LTW Comparison Essay. By writing comparison essays after persuasive essays, students will be able to compare the two kinds of writing to each other. They will find that all writing requires coming up with something to say (invention), organizing the material (arrangement), and expressing ideas in a fitting way (elocution). Further, they will see that the common topics and elocution tools they learned in Level I have prepared them to complete any kind of writing. In the comparison essay, students will refine their skills of outline, exordium, amplification, narration, and metaphor. The class will use the lovely Tales of Wonder Volume Two to stir their imaginations as they learn the concepts in class but each student will be free to choose their own topics from (literature, history, Tales of Wonder, etc.) on which to write.

Required Texts: LTW Level I Student Workbook, LTW Comparison Essay Text, Tales of Wonder Volume 2
Pre-requisites: Completion of LTW I
Suggested age: At least 13 years old
Registration numbers: Minimum: 4; Maximum: 14

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Lost Tools of Writing I and Your Choice of Lit with Kelly Clawson, Mondays at 12pm EST

This year-long course on persuasive essays is the foundation built by Level I that prepares students for the classical rhetoric addresses that follow in LTW II and III, the judicial and deliberative addresses. In LTW I, students learn the three kinds of tools that help them with the problems that all writers face: what do I write about, how do I organize and choose my thoughts, and how do I express them in meaningful ways. Those tools are the canons of Invention (what do I write about), Arrangement (how do I choose and organize my thoughts), and Elocution (how do I express them in meaningful ways). Students learn the tools that make up those canons, tools like good questions (the common topics), the ANI, introductions, refutations, & conclusions, and paralellism, simile, and metaphor—among many others!

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Lost Tools of Writing I and Heroes & Villains with Kelly Clawson, Mondays at 1:30pm EST
Follow the heroes and villains of history while learning the Lost Tools of Writing. We will explore and discuss the stories of Leonidas, Cincinnatus, Genghis Khan, as well as more recent figures such as George Washington and Billy the Kid. Students will use the Lost Tools of Writing, Level I to explore the issues faced by these historical figures and learn to write about them using the first three canons of rhetoric: invention, arrangement, and elocution.

No prerequisite, ages 12 and up

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Lost Tools of Writing Level I Advanced & Narnia with Christy Jones, Tuesdays at 10am EST
How about spending more time in Narnia while getting more comfortable writing essays? Join us as we read and discuss C.S. Lewis’ books The Voyage of the Dawn TreaderThe Silver Chair, The Horse and His Boy, and The Last Battle. This year-long course will provide additional practice and review for students who have already completed LTW 1 at home, at school, or online with us. The first semester will focus on the tools of Circumstance, Relation, and Testimony in Essays Five to Nine. Students will also become better artisans of Refutation and Narratio, while perfecting Simile, Alliteration, Metaphor, and Assonance along the way. During the second semester, students will learn to craft the Complete Comparison Essay.

Required Texts: LTW Level I Student Workbook, LTW Comparison Essay workbok, and Chronicles of Narnia books
Pre-requisites: Completion of LTW I
Suggested age: At least 13 years old
Registration numbers: Minimum: 4; Maximum: 14

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Level I & C. S. Lewis' Ransom Trilogy with Cheryl Floyd, Tuesdays at 1pm EST
The Lost Tools of Writing is an ideal composition curriculum for students in seventh through twelfth grade who already have a relatively solid understanding of grammar and sentence structure and who have at least a rudimentary amount of writing experience - and, most importantly, who are ready to think for themselves.

What better way to begin your student's journey into thinking and decision-making than Lewis' beloved Space Trilogy series. Throughout the course of the year we will work through each novel asking deeper questions of the text and honoring the reasons behind a character's decision utilizing the skills offered through LTW I.

NOTE: It is suggested that students do a quick read over the summer of the novels. This can be accomplished by listening to audio books or just reading through each work. Closer reading will occur through the course.
Additional Required Text: ISBN TBA
Registration numbers: Min. 6, Max. 14

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Level I & D'Auliare's Greek Myths with April Langan, Wednesdays at 2pm EST
Spend a year with mythological gods and monsters. Ask why Arachne dared to challenge a goddess. Imagine Persephone’s grief over the loss of her daughter. While exploring these ancient stories, students will learn how to ask questions, organize their ideas, and craft a thoughtful essay. LTW of Writing Level 1 introduces students to three canons of rhetoric: invention, arrangement, and elocution. These canons offer solutions to the problems every writer faces. In Invention, students ask questions to generate ideas for their writing. Arrangement shows students how to organize those thoughts, and Elocution focuses on the appropriate expression of their ideas. Students will be reading D’Aulaire’s Greek Myths alongside LTW classwork. Lively class discussions are a certainty. Greek myths will also provide an excellent foundation in mythology to illuminate references to the Greek gods in epic poetry and Shakespeare.

Additional Required Text: ISBN TBA
Registration numbers: Min. MET, Max. 14

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Level I & American Literature with Cyndi McCallister, Thursdays at 10am EST
Students will explore gripping short stories, exciting novels, and lovely poems that capture our nation's history. All will be covered at a restful pace while learning the are art of writing beautifully and thinking well.  The Lost Tools of Writing step-by-step instruction makes writing manageable even for students who lack experience or confidence in writing and its lessons in thinking, organizing, and expression will challenge and delight even experienced and eager writers. Students will complete nine essays over the course of the year.
Additional Required Text: The Lost Tools of Writing, 5th Edition, Student Workbook, published by the Circe Institute and the following American Literature Selections: The Call of the Wild, The Red Badge of Courage, The Scarlet Letter, Billy Budd, Tom Sawyer,  The Gift of the Magi, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Old Man and the Sea, The Glass Menagerie, and Narrative Life of Frederick Douglas.  Poetry links will be provided by the teacher.

Registration numbers: Min. MET, Max. 14

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Level I & the Classic Epics with Jacob Douvier, Thursdays at 4:45pm EST
Students will fight on the plains of Troy with Achilles and Hector in The Iliad, journey home after the war with Odysseus in The Odyssey, and set out with Aeneas across the seas on a dangerous journey to found Rome in The Aeneid. They will reflect on the decisions made by these characters and write about them using the Lost Tools of Writing Level I.
Additional Required Text: ISBN TBA

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Level I Pre-Course with Camille Hunt, Thurdays at 11am EST
This year-long course of study will include prerequisites for thinking and writing well. We will discuss and practice grammar, including what a sentence is, parts of speech, and using strong verbs with correct tenses. We will discuss and practice the tech elements of paragraph formatting, submitting assignments/documents plus revising, saving, and resubmitting assignments. We will discuss and practice how to check your own work and how to ask a clear, specific question when confusion arises. All this will take place in the context of working through approximately the first half of Level I of the Lost Tools of Writing. 

Text: Tales of Wonder Vol. I
Registration numbers: Min. MET, Max. 14

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Classical Rhetoric: The Comparison Essay

with Cheryl Floyd, Camille Hunt, & April Langan

If you are looking for a class to extend and deepen your student's application of the Lost Tools of Writing Level I skills and ideas, read here. Comparison Essays fulfills the purpose of understanding people, things, or ideas more deeply, or assessing whether one is better or in some way more desirable than another. The bigger purpose of these thinking and writing skills is to grow in wisdom and prudence by practicing making finer distinctions and better decisions. Students can learn and practice principles and habits of decision-making for their own lives.

Required texts: The Comparison Essay Workbook

Suggested Age/Background: 13 or with instructor and/or headmaster permission


Prerequisites: Completion of LTW Level I.
 


Fall Semester:


Comparison and Watership Down with April Langan, Mondays at 12pm EST
What if you knew your community was in danger? Should you look for another home? Who should lead the way? To contemplate answers to these questions, students will take a closer look at the common topic of comparison while reading Watership Down in community. This course will build on the foundation of the persuasive essay in LTW Level I and introduce the comparison essay. Through comparison, students will assess differences in people, things, and ideas, while identifying commonalities. Students will have an opportunity to engage in meaningful discussions of the things that bind us while crafting a comparison essay. This story of an unlikely band of rabbits provides fertile ground for comparisons of archetypes, human nature, and sacrifice.

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Comparison and Jane Eyre + Pride and Prejudice with Cheryl Floyd, Tuesdays at 11am EST
What do Charlotte Bronte and Jane Austen have in common? They were both British female writers during the 19th century. How are they different? Bronte approached her novel, Jane Eyre, with a gothic slant while Austen crafted a novel of manners. Do their characters have anything in common? Their plots or their themes? How do the novels differ? Does one treat ideas about marriage and love better than the other? Explore these ideas and more using The Lost Tools of Writing - Comparison Essay.

Registration numbers: Min. 6, Max. 14

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Comparison and Tales of Wonder Vol.1 with Camille Hunt, Wednesdays at 12pm EST
This semester-long Comparison-essay course guides students to write four comparison essays in one semester. Invention is adapted from Level I’s comparing. Arrangement includes three different outlines, repeating the last one for the fourth essay. The trope of metaphor is refined during elocution. We will read and write about stories from Tales of Wonder, Volume 1 in the Fall. The Spring class will use Tales of Wonder, Vol. 2.

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Spring Semester:


Comparison and Wendell Berry with April Langan, Mondays at 12pm EST
The works of Wendell Berry provide a sense of deep roots: our relationship with nature, shared history with kin, and the responsibility to love one another. These are ideals worthy of contemplation. In this course, students will build on their foundation of the persuasive essay from LTW Level I while learning the form of the comparison essay. Students will assess differences in people, things, and ideas. They will identify similarities through the common topic of comparison. Hannah Coulter, Jayber Crow and a selected essay will be read and discussed in class. Through the lens of comparison, students will have the opportunity to ponder propriety, goodness, and community.

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Comparison and Passge to India with Cheryl Floyd, Tuesdays at 11am EST
What do 1920's England and India have in common? They were both under British rule. How were they different? India's people were still steeped in their culture while British dignitaries and visitors attempted to re-make home. When cultures clash and differ how can people find commonality? Explore these ideas and more using The Lost Tools of Writing - Comparison Essay. 

Registration numbers: Min. 6, Max. 14

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Comparison and Tales of Wonder Vol.2 with Camille Hunt, Wednesdays at 12pm EST
This semester-long Comparison-essay course guides students to write four comparison essays in one semester. Invention is adapted from Level I’s comparing. Arrangement includes three different outlines, repeating the last one for the fourth essay. The trope of metaphor is refined during elocution. We will read and write about stories from Tales of Wonder, Volume 1 in the Fall. The Spring class will use Tales of Wonder, Vol. 2.

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Classical Rhetoric: Lost Tools of Writing, Level II

with Jacob Douvier, Camille Hunt, April Langan, & Cyndi McCallister

This course picks up where LTW Level One course ended and therefore is open only to returning students or those who have spoken with the instructor. Instruction will begin in the fall with a review of Level One material. Then the class will learn to write the Judicial Essay,  all while learning and mastering new Topics of Invention, Arrangement tools, and Elocution skills. Level 2 essays will include citations, a focus on the audience, problems of bias, and explorations of justice, laws, evidence, and motive. Students will use the updated Lost Tools Level 2 edition for this course. 

Note: Admission to the LTW II course is by invitation/permission only. Students must be given permission to enter by their LTW I teacher.

Required texts: LTW Level II Student Workbook


Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of a LTW Level I

Suggested Age: 14 or with instructor and/or headmaster permission




Level II & Shakespeare with April Langan, Mondays at 2pm EST
Shakespeare is meant to be experienced in community. The characters demand the reader’s attention and offer opportunities for students to contemplate the levity of the characters’ actions. Students are sure to have strong opinions. This course will offer a forum to discuss their ideas while working through LTW Level II and the judicial address. Students will read Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, Henry V, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Hamlet. This course will ask students to pass judgement on a character’s actions while considering evidence, motivation, and the law. They will build on the foundation of LTW Level I while adding more tools to their tool boxes throughout the year. LTW Level II will bring Shakespeare’s characters to life.
Additional Required Text: ISBN TBA

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Level II & Plutarch's Roman Lives with Jacob Douvier, Tuesdays at 4:45pm EST
The Roman history Livy once said of the study of history "you can find for yourself and your country both examples and warnings; fine things to take as models, base things, rotten through and through, to avoid.” To this end, students will study the rise and fall of the Roman Republic through the lives of famous and influential Romans from Romulus to Caesar in Plutarch's Roman Lives. Key decisions made by these men will be carefully considered using the Lost Tools of Writing Level 2.
Additional Required Text: ISBN TBA

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Level II & your choice of literature with Camille Hunt, Wednesdays at 10am EST
This year-long course on judicial addresses builds on the foundation of Level I. Special topics of invention (the stasis questions) are added. Arrangement focuses on writing good sentences including terminating sentences, and on refining parts of the essay. Elocution introduces new schemes and tropes, plus citations. Students may choose issues from the literature or history stories assigned to them by other teachers.

Registration numbers: Min. MET, Max. 14

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Level II & British Literature with Cyndi McCallister, Thursdays at 12pm EST
Students will enjoy a meditative pace through ten classic selections from British Literature, including allegories, novels, poems, and short stories that will capture the student’s imagination. Students will acquire new tools of Invention, refine the elements of Arrangement, and learn to express their case beautifully and clearly using new schemes, tropes and editing skills in Elocution. Students will complete 7+ addresses.
Required Text: The Lost Tools of Writing Level II Student Workbook, published by the Circe Institute and the following British Literature Selections: The Hobbit, The Screwtape Letters, Beowulf, Tale of Two Cities, Father Brown Short Stories, Pride and Prejudice, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Canterbury Tales, and Pilgrim’s Progress.  Poetry links will be provided by the teacher.

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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Classical Rhetoric: Lost Tools of Writing, Level III

with Camille Hunt & Cyndi McCallister

In LTW III, we learn to make decisions about a future action. We assume a perspective, find a necessary question, generate an issue, and attempt to persuade the audience (the decision-maker) to act: either to implement a change (the proposal) or to maintain the status quo. We learn special topics to find advantages: honor and/or utility. In addition, we add three new and powerful tools: the modes of persuasion, the four causes, and analogical reasoning.

The deliberative outline adapts the elements (amplification, narratio, proof, etc.) to the needs of the deliberative address.

New schemes and tropes are included, along with paragraph coherence and cohesion. 

When we have to make decisions about the future, the problem is obvious: we don’t know it. In real life, that means any decision we make is, to some extent, uncertain. Therefore the bigger purpose of studying Level III is to grow in wisdom and prudence by practicing making difficult decisions from which we can learn principles and habits of decision making for our own lives and communities.

Note: Admission to the LTW III is by invitation/permission only. Students must have satisfactorily completed courses in LTW I & II. 

Required Texts: LTW Level III Student Workbook

Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of LTW I & II

Suggested Age: 14 or with instructor and/or headmaster's permission


Level III & your choice of literature with Camille Hunt, Wednesdays at 2pm EST
This year-long course on deliberative addresses builds on the foundation of Levels I and II. Special topics of invention are learned for deciding an issue for an unknown future. Arrangement introduces formal logic plus deliberative topics to refine parts of the essay appropriately. Elocution practices paragraph coherence, cohesion, and transitions—plus thirteen new schemes and tropes. Students may choose issues from their reading in other classes.

Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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LTW Senior Thesis


LTW Senior Thesis with Cyndi McCallister, Thursdays at 2pm EST

Students will write a senior thesis, all while mastering the Topics of Invention, Arrangement tools, and Elocution skills. Students will be led from clearly defining their thesis topic, to thoughtful arrangement, and to appropriate expression. Students will be guided through responsible research including how to properly cite their authority and how to consider issues like bias in their sources. This classical writing program teaches students more than the just the basics of writing a senior thesis. It will also challenge their thinking by teaching them to integrate their years of learning into a single issue. By employing the three canons of classical rhetoric - invention, arrangement, and elocution, the student will be equipped to overcome the three problems all writers face while tackling an expanded essay and to cultivate deeper thinking while integrating their years of learning. The step-by-step instruction makes the writing of a senior thesis manageable for all students.   The lessons in thinking, organizing, and expression will challenge and delight even experienced and eager writers.  Students in this course will complete a senior thesis as well as receive instruction in memory and delivery in preparation for their presentation.  

Prerequisite: LTW Level One
Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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The Lost Tools of Writing I, II, & III 6 Week Intensives for Adults

with Camille Hunt, April Langan, & Andrea Lipinski
Designed to help you teach your children, these LTW Intensive courses for adults will model the teaching process, while also helping you improve your own writing and thinking. This class will reveal the ancient truths behind the LTW program while at the same time enabling you to teach effectively and powerfuly on a day to day basis. 

Required texts: LTW Level I, II, or III Complete Set

Prerequisites: None

Suggested Age: Adults

Level I with Andrea Lipinski, Mondays at 8pm EST from July 20 to August 24, 2020

Level II with April Langan, Wednesdays at 7pm EST from June 3 to July 8, 2020

Level III with Camille Hunt, Tuesday at 7:30pm EST from July 21 to August 25, 2020


Latin I & II

with Buck Holler
Using Lingua Latina per se Illustrata by Hans Orberg, the ultimate goal of the Latin program is to attain mastery and command of the language in order to read Latin classics and to understand the Latin authors in their language. This is effectively achieved through an active use of the language — writing and speaking in Latin. 

These courses are taught entirely in Latin, with students first learning the meaning of words and phrases in context.  The consistent repetition of essential vocabulary and grammatical forms through a written narrative and oral instruction are complimented by a persistent study of Latin grammar.

Level One covers all the fundamental elements of Latin grammar, while Level Two will introduce students to Latin authors and Roman history at a more advanced level. 

All students need to begin with Level One even if they have had Latin in the past. Because of the nature of the course, it requires the student to begin thinking in Latin. In addition to understanding Latin, the course requires the student to produce Latin using correct grammatical structures, which is a more advanced skill. 

Required texts: Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, Pars I: Familia Romana
Prerequisites: None
Suggested Age: 14 or with instructor and/or headmaster's permission


Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14 (Latin II minimum has been met!)

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Oral Latin A & B

Oral Latin - A with Levi Gulliver

This course is for students who wish to begin understanding Latin directly. Through many conversations, fables, pictures, and potentially silly scenes, students will practice listening to spoken Latin. As they listen, students will also begin to practice speaking Latin with the teacher and other students. It is designed for students with little or no knowledge of Latin, though students familiar with the grammar of Latin will certainly benefit from oral learning as well. The course will prepare them for Oral Latin B, as they age, as well as for the Latin I course, offered through CiRCE Online, using Lingua Latina. 

Oral Latin is focused on the two first arts of language: hearing and speaking. As such, reading—and to a greater extent writing—will be only secondary; these more advanced skills rely on the solid foundation students build hearing and saying Latin themselves. The motto of this course is Latinam discere Latina (to learn Latin using Latin). This means that the teacher will use as much Latin—and as little English—as possible, allowing the students to absorb the language directly. Without much English, students will connect the words and sentences they hear with actions, images, and other Latin words to build their knowledge.

Since the primary work of this course will happen during classtime, ‘homework’ will be minimal: practicing the new Latin and sometimes listening to or watching Latin recordings.

For students 8 - 10 years old.
Meets Wednesdays and Fridays 10:00am - 10:45am ET.
Class Size: Minimum - 4, Maximum 14

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Oral Latin - B with Levi Gulliver

This course is for students who wish to begin understanding Latin directly. Through many conversations, fables, pictures, and potentially silly scenes, students will practice listening to spoken Latin. As they listen, students will also begin to practice speaking Latin with the teacher and other students. It is designed for students with little or no knowledge of Latin, though students familiar with the grammar of Latin will certainly benefit from oral learning as well. The course will prepare them for the Latin I course, offered through CiRCE Online, using Lingua Latina. 

Oral Latin is focused on the two first arts of language: hearing and speaking. As such, reading—and to a greater extent writing—will be only secondary; these more advanced skills rely on the solid foundation students build hearing and saying Latin themselves. The motto of this course is Latinam discere Latina (to learn Latin using Latin). This means that the teacher will use as much Latin—and as little English—as possible, allowing the students to absorb the language directly. Without much English, students will connect the words and sentences they hear with actions, images, and other Latin words to build their knowledge.

Since the primary work of this course will happen during classtime, ‘homework’ will be minimal: practicing the new Latin and sometimes listening to or watching Latin recordings.

For students 11 - 13 years old.
Meets Wednesdays and Fridays 11:00am - 11:45am ET.
Class Size: Minimum - 4, Maximum 14

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Introduction to Formal Logic

with Tonya Rozelle
Before studying philosophy, whether it is the philosophy of Plato or C. S. Lewis, students should develop a clear understanding of formal logic. This course will help students learn basic aspects of formal logic, specifically, the structure of classical syllogisms. Students with practice applying this basic knowledge to other areas of study in order to strengthen their analytical thinking, which will naturally lead to stronger essays.

Required texts: Memoria Press Traditional Logic I: Introduction to Formal Logic, text and workbook
Prerequisites: None
Suggested Age: 12 or up with instructor and/or headmaster's permission


Registration numbers: Min. 4, Max. 14

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