Jessica Deagle Jul 27, 2018

There's Brideshead, Howards End, and Scarlett’s Tara. Even Mary Lennox wanted her own little piece of earth from Mr. Craven’s vast holdings. Literature is full of a love for the lands and places we live in and the effects they have upon us, calling us back to them again and again. In a sense, they become our identity and our salvation. It's a beautiful motif and it speaks to my heart, yet its words may prove deceptive, in a way, if I am not careful to interpret what they say with a Kingdom mindset and long for more.

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Joshua Gibbs Jul 26, 2018

The following sample comes from How to Be Unlucky: Reflection on the Pursuit of Virtue, which is now available. 

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Danny Breed Jul 25, 2018

Have you considered that the natural relationship children have with their environment greatly affects their education? God has woven into each child a particular way of relating to the things around him or her. If we don’t understand this relationship, then we may be inadvertently miseducating our children.

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Jeffrey Wald Jul 23, 2018

He writhes his body, arching his head back and rubbing his feet together. “It’s too hard,” he proclaims. “I can’t do it!”

Immediately, I want to lash out, “Too hard for you?! Too hard for you!? No, it’s not too hard for you. It’s too hard for me! I can’t teach you! Just read the silly prose! It’s not difficult! See: The cat sat on the floor.”

But thankfully, most days I am able to hold in my frustration and simply sit silently, pointing to the first three-letter word printed there, or almost calmly respond, “It’s OK son, I know you can do it.”

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Christine Norvell Jul 20, 2018

Recently our entire high school of 125 students and a handful of teachers saw Thornton Wilder's play Our Town at a local university, free I might add. For a play written in 1938, it was indeed a snapshot of its time, approaching mid-century America post World War I and the Great Depression. After the country had seen so much loss of life (and quality of life), it was no wonder that a certain hopelessness invaded the story. In essence, Wilder simplistically depicted the passing of time in the place and people of Grover's Corner, Americana. Yes, Americana.

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Lindsey Brigham Knott Jul 19, 2018

As summer days speed by, and a new year’s round of classes draws nearer, teachers have the leisure—so often pressed out amidst the demands of the school year!—to think more broadly and deeply about the content, method, and objectives of their courses and teaching practices.

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Joshua Butcher Jul 18, 2018

Last June I enjoyed the great delight of attending my first Society for Classical Learning Conference, which was held in Dallas, Texas. There were a number of excellent plenaries and presentations, some of which have continued to spark conversation. I also had the privilege of speaking on formal rhetoric curriculum. In hindsight I tried to pack far too much detail into the time, and as a result my presentation suffered from a lack of helpful, clarifying examples. (Thankfully there were fewer than ten folks in the room who had to suffer through the abstraction!)

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Zachariah Rosenbaum Jul 16, 2018

Being 17 years old, one might think that I would not have much to say in favor of education. In fact, I am certain that many people who will read this article assume that I would prefer to spend my time bashing the school system from my social media outlets and blog. However, in writing this article I intend to do just the opposite.

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Aaron Ames Jul 13, 2018

It should be of urgent concern that the meaning of the English word “belief,” an indispensable lens for both the confession of faith and cultivation of wisdom, has profoundly evolved. In his work Faith and Belief, Wilfred Cantwell Smith outlines this dilemma:

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Kate Deddens Jul 11, 2018

Allow me to tell you The Fable of the Fearsome √2, a proud irrational number with an unsettlingly sinister story behind it.

Feel free to share this story with the little children whom you tuck in. Please note that this is, like any respectable fairytale, the stuff of legend. Furthermore, as is a storyteller’s prerogative, I’ve taken a few minor liberties—mostly with respect to vocabulary—in retelling the legend.

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