Andrew Kern Feb 15, 2009

I have a little problem with the current obsession with “worldview thinking” in Christian and classical circles. I believe that it subtly moves us from a framework that was used from creation until the mid-19th century. I also believe that in our attempts to build a comprehensive Christian “worldview” that we have de-emphasized our Christian narrative.

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Andrew Kern Feb 12, 2009
It would be unjust to fail to mention that today marks the 200th birthday of Abraham Lincoln, unquestionably one of America's greatest presidents. When I was a child, the silhouettes of Washington and Lincoln had an iconographic power over me. The face on the penny, the curly beard, the strong, arched hairline above the noble brow, the resolute expression all wormed their way into my childish reverence.
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Andrew Kern Feb 12, 2009
If I were to blog every day from here to July I could not adequately explore the reasons for and importance of the idea of Nature as a theme for our conference this summer. Let me say this much to begin: Postively, nature is what makes true education possible. By true education I mean what educators meant until well into the 19th century whenever they spoke about education: the cultivation of wisdom and virtue, or, even more briefly, the pursuit of virtue (since wisdom is a virtue).
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Andrew Kern Feb 11, 2009
The Lost Tools of Writing, being a modern version of classical rhetoric and an application of the "Organon" (tool - these are the "lost tools" Dorothy Sayers was writing about) of Aristotle, is the foundation of everything you will study with the possible exception of mathematics. It is the trivium. LTW is, by far, the most efficient and the most essential curriculum material you will ever use.
  • It is the foundation for traditional, formal logic, because it teaches material logic.
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Andrew Kern Feb 11, 2009
I was over at Mystie's amazing blog, where I came across this quotation under a link to our earlier post about education for slavery.
Tests are for slaves; an alternative would be the medieval (and Charlotte Mason) practice of examinations.
Then I tried to find a way in Mystie's blog to contact her because this is something I need to learn more about. It could be one of the most important keys to taking classical education to the next stage of renewal.
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Andrew Kern Feb 10, 2009
There is only one thing more dangerous than education and we fail to appreciate that reality because of our sentimental approach to education. We think it must be good in every case for every person. Maybe that’s true if we’re really talking about education. But the sleight of hand that transfers the word education to the word school and then reduces the school to an information administation building blinds us. The only thing more dangerous than real education is the illusion of education - to be falsely educated.
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Andrew Kern Feb 9, 2009
Today the church commemorates a martyr from third century Antioch named Nicepheros. He was a layman who was close friends with a priest named Saprikios, and it is the story of Saprikios that grips me. It seems that these two had a falling out at one time and stopped speaking with each other. Hmm. I guess that happened in the early church too! After a while, Nicephoros tried to reconcile with Saprikios, but the priest would not accept his overtures. Here is where it gets interesting.
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Andrew Kern Feb 8, 2009
My daughter, Larissa, my wife, Karen, and I were hanging out at Brian and Shannon Phillips tonight where we talked about Plato's Republic with Josh and Rebekkah (sp?) Leland. It was an informal, casual conversation about important things like music, the formation of the soul, how to become a gentleman, stuff like that.
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Andrew Kern Feb 8, 2009
"Lord, have mercy on me the sinner." The Publican
Back in the 90's I used to hear people ask how we will prevent classically educated students from becoming proud. That was a good question, because knowledge puffs up and we put a lot of emphasis on knowledge. I hear the question less now, but I still think about it  a lot, if only because I see so much pride in myself. Growing up moderately poor, I remember thinking that money made people bad too. And of course we've all heard Lord Acton's misleading proverb: "Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely."
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Andrew Kern Feb 7, 2009
Ever since I was a kid I've had a fascination with the causes of historical change. Is it great men and women that change the world, or is it the world that produces great men and women? Was Thomas Carlyle right with his Romantic view when he said:
"The history of the world is but the biography of great men,"
Or did Herbert Spencer get it right with his more scientic approach:
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