Andrew Kern Feb 21, 2009
At first I put this post in a comment below in the great dialogue James started over worldview. Then I realized it was a very long post and that this is MY BLOG! ;  ) so I figured I'd pull rank and post it here. Hope you don't mind. I have to chime in on this worldview discussion because I have a complicated relationship to this notion of worldview. To reduce it to something more or less simple, let me put it this way:
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Andrew Kern Feb 20, 2009
Once upon a time, a little chicken named Chicken Little was sitting under a tree when an acorn fell on her head. In a panic, she ran around telling everybody who would listen that the sky was falling. At first nobody believed her, but finally one particularly silly and vulnerable little creature panicked with her. Then that silly little creatures silly mother believed her out of sentiment, which drew in her father out of family loyalty.
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Andrew Kern Feb 20, 2009
The Liberty Fund just sent me one of the treasures they publish to try to save the world from its own follies. In this case, it's called The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy. Heinrich A. Rommen wrote this book while practicing law during the dissolution of the Weimar Republic and the rise of the NAZI party in Germany. Eventually, he was forced to flee to the States, where he became a professor at Georgetown University.
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Andrew Kern Feb 20, 2009
Heads of school prudently ask me, "What will my teachers take from your conference on nature? Will there be anything practical?" To that I joyfully respond, "I think so."
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Andrew Kern Feb 19, 2009

   

Did you know that Plato was the head of school at the first Academy? It's easy to forget, what with all this talk about Platonism being otherworldly and all that, but we do well to remember. In fact, I'm convinced that Plato's real intent when he wrote the Republic had more to do with schools than with governments.

 

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Andrew Kern Feb 18, 2009

If you were to ask what the fundamental principle of my educational, political, economic theory is, I think I might well answer this way:

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Andrew Kern Feb 18, 2009
In the last section, I dealt with the origin of “worldview thinking” and discussed secular and modern man’s futility in constructing such a structure. In this section, I will focus on the statement that I made in the last blog. I asserted that I see dangers in the recent goals of many schools that seek to produce students who are “worldview thinkers”. I am fearful of the current usage of worldview thinking as the ultimate paradigm within which a school works.
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Andrew Kern Feb 17, 2009
We are not here studying the philosophy, we see it, as part of the ordered world. The aim of the poet is to state a vision, and no vision of life can be complete which does not include the articulate formulation of life which human minds make.
So TS Eliot on Dante This is why I believe teachers must all be poetic and literary, even in kindergarten and even in science class. Nobody was more versed in the sciences of his day than Dante. And this is why I believe the basic study of a head of school should be, not administration, but literature.
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Andrew Kern Feb 16, 2009

It is the nature of the fine arts to push the boundaries of expression because the idea can never be perfectly expressed. The trouble arises when the idea is set aside and boundaries are pushed for the sake of pushing them.

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Andrew Kern Feb 15, 2009

I have a little problem with the current obsession with “worldview thinking” in Christian and classical circles. I believe that it subtly moves us from a framework that was used from creation until the mid-19th century. I also believe that in our attempts to build a comprehensive Christian “worldview” that we have de-emphasized our Christian narrative.

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