Josh Mayo Apr 15, 2019

There are three kinds of teachers: the tough, the nice, and the charitable.

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Joshua Gibbs Apr 12, 2019

Student: What do you think of video games?

Gibbs: Oh, playing a round or two of Tetris every few months is probably not going to kill anyone.

Student: That’s not really what I meant.

Gibbs: I know.

Student: I wanted to know what you thought about video games as a hobby.

Gibbs: You mean the kind of thing which a fellow spends a few hours on every day? The kind of thing which he talks about and thinks about at length?

Student: Yes.

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Joshua Gibbs Apr 12, 2019

Having led eight high school classes on trips to New York City, I have developed a fairly tight game plan. This year’s trip to New York came with the first significant rule change in almost a decade: no phones.

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Danny Breed Apr 12, 2019

“Cinderella” is neither an allegory nor a gospel story, yet as with all of creation, it reveals aspects of the gospel story in various ways. Just as creation reveals God’s divine nature and eternal power, this tale reflects particular experiences of the universal church that manifest God’s dealings with the church. Within this beloved fairy tale, we see a picture of the endurance, favor, and rescue of the universal church.

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Justin Hall Apr 10, 2019

One morning I shadowed a middle-school tour inside the Cleveland Art Museum for half an hour, overhearing the tour guide’s lecture. I had already spent two hours between the medieval and romantic exhibits—a breathtaking experience of history given in full sweep—and now, as though inevitably, I end my round in the late-modern and contemporary gallery. Here I find the group of students sitting on the floor in a huddle, hugging their knees, while a middle-aged woman, the museum tour guide, gestures to a painting behind her.

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Jessica Deagle Apr 8, 2019

I love reading and listening to stories. When the stories feel real and true, I love them even more because they make me feel that the longings and dreams I have are not thwarted but possible. They resonate with my heart and propel me to noble behaviors. When I consider David and his sins yet hear God proclaim him as a man after his own heart (because of his willingness to repent), I feel encouraged that I too can pursue the heart of God.

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Joshua Gibbs Apr 6, 2019

I have no original thoughts on art. They are all borrowed from Roger Scruton.

McLaren: What do you think of Jackson Pollock?

Gibbs: Not a fan.

McLaren: But he’s a genius.

Gibbs: Interesting you say that. If you were in a conversation with someone who said he wasn’t a fan of Shakespeare, what would you reply?

McLaren: I would say, “What’s wrong with you? Have you never read Hamlet?”

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Joshua Gibbs Apr 6, 2019

Student: Mr. Gibbs, we got into this long discussion about infant baptism in theology class and heard about all these different beliefs regarding baptism. What do you think? Should we baptize infants?

Gibbs: Should who baptize babies? You?

Student: No. Should anyone baptize babies? What is your personal belief on the matter?

Gibbs: That is not a matter about which I have a personal belief. I simply do what my church tells me to do.  

Student: And what does your church tell you to do?

Gibbs: My church baptizes babies.

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Kate Deddens Apr 4, 2019

Our era is dismantling millennia of incarnated memories with increasing fervor and speed—“old” books are considered irrelevant, so much so that it can be difficult to find classics in local libraries or school curricula; monuments and artistic creations, some of which have withstood the ravages of decades, if not centuries, are toppled in the name of social progress; beautifully crafted belongings, once meaningful heirlooms, are jettisoned in favor of the newest machine-made decorating fads and end up in dusty thrift shops.

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Jonathan Gray Apr 3, 2019

March 20 marked the vernal equinox: the last day of winter and first day of spring. Late in the week, while talking with my mother on the phone, she told me that the sandhill cranes are migrating over my hometown in northeast Illinois, flying back from a winter spent in warmer climes. Growing up, these flocks foretold the imminent arrival of the spring thaw, the end of the bone-numbing, lake-effect cold. March 21 marks the beginning of a new season as well.

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