Joshua Gibbs Oct 28, 2020

Given the sorry state of American public schools, it is not surprising that many classical Christian schools use words like “excellence” and “mastery” to describe their goals for students. The school that aims to graduate students with “mastery” over their subjects will obviously not be content with seniors who have only attained an 8th grade reading level.

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Ellen Norris Oct 27, 2020

Dear Mrs. Norris, 

I go to a classical school. Most of my neighborhood friends and some kids I know from soccer all go to public school. When I hang out with them, they make fun of my school. They say that it isn’t a real school because we don’t have very competitive sports, we have to wear uniforms, and we have to take Latin. They make me feel like I’m missing out and like I’m never going to be as cool as they are, all because I go to a classical school. At this point, I’ve started resenting my school for being so weird.

Sincerely, 

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CiRCE Staff Oct 27, 2020

Joshua Gibbs is tired of seeing people be made to feel guilty for celebrating Christmas to the fullest: "After years of watching Grinches, atheists, and fake historians (many of them self-professed Christians) on social media spread all manner of lies and misinformation about Christmas, I decided to take matters into my own hands and put together a saucy, robust defense of celebrating our Lord's birthday." That defense is found in a new book from CiRCE Books: The 25th: New and Selected Christmas Essays, out November 23rd and available now to

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Joshua Gibbs Oct 22, 2020

Not every book is as easy to understand as Pride & Prejudice.

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James Ranieri Oct 21, 2020

Every parent I know is intimately familiar with the barrage of questions we receive from our children. This past summer our family spent a week at a beautiful lake in the mountains of North Carolina. My wife, a high school literature teacher, and I, a religious studies teacher, planned to use our peaceful vacation as an opportunity to read and prepare for the school year ahead. We have three beautiful children, a nine, seven, and five-year-old.

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Andrew Kern Oct 19, 2020

"It would be a considerable fraud to do a book on American government which talked as if the constitution were still being substantially observed, that pretended that when Presidents took the oath of office they intended to observe the bounds set by the Constitution, that Congressmen recited their pledges with the same intent, and that Federal judges were still construing the Consitution as it was written." - Clarence Carson: Basic American Government, 1993

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Andrew Kern Oct 16, 2020

"Every writer of history proposes to himself an original method" - G.W.F. Hegel 

What exactly am I doing when I do history? 

If I ask the question based on the meaning of the word, I make an interesting discovery: history is from the Greek word for inquiry. History, therefore, as originally imagined, was an inquiry. 

An inquiry into what? And how is it to be conducted? 

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Austin Hoffman Oct 16, 2020

The butterfly effect proposes that small actions can cause large effects. It suggests that a butterfly launching off a mountain peak in Asia determines if a hurricane will strike Texas. Thus, one of the lightest, most insignificant creatures unleashes a terrifying, destructive power. The principle can be observed by throwing a stone into a pond and watching the waves ripple outward growing larger. History records monumental turning points hinging on small details. How would the Persian War have ended if Xerxes didn’t accept Themistocles’s invitation to Salamis Bay?

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Joshua Gibbs Oct 15, 2020

Logic figures heavily into a classical Christian education and no small portion of informal logic books is concerned with the subject of authority; however, ever since the French Revolution, Christians have been profoundly confused on the nature of authority. While the “appeal to false authority” is a widely recognized logical fallacy, a good number of modern Christians have followed modern secularists in the belief that every claim of authority is false.

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Andrew Kern Oct 15, 2020

Huckleberry Finn's author is supposed to have said that it is easier to fool a person than it is to convince him that he has been fooled. That triggered a longish reflection in me wherein I asked myself, why is that? And, is that good or bad? 

Meanwhile, I have been teaching a class on Christian classical rhetoric and have been struck by a particular, somewhat unsettling fact for a modern or postmodern or at least conventional thinker such as I am. God rarely defends Himself when He speaks. He expects you to hear it and respond. 

Is there a connection? 

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