Emily Brigham Sep 3, 2018

I vividly remember sitting in a dim school auditorium my junior year of high school, pencil positioned to take the PSAT when all test-takers were required to copy out a pledge promising that no cheating would take place. The requirement? The pledge had to be written in cursive. One by one, students’ hands went up as they asked, “How do you write in cursive?” “How do you make a capital ‘i’?” and “Are all the letters supposed to be connected?”

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Josh Mayo Aug 31, 2018

Where does literature fit in a well-ordered life?

That’s a question I try to get my students to ask on the last day of “Civilization and Literature,” a core humanities course I teach at Grove City College. A small percentage of these young men and women will never teach a literary text. The lion’s share never blink at the prospect of a PhD in English. (And thank heaven, since someone needs to keep the world running.) What part will the classics play in their lives five years from now, ten years from now, twenty?

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Joshua Gibbs Aug 29, 2018

One. The teacher of virtue and the stand-up comedian very nearly have the same job: both stand before a room full of people and tell stories and make observations which highlight the absurdities and idiosyncrasies of the human condition. The comedian gauges the audience by observing slight alterations in human faces. He must clock the mood of the audience, measure the volume of responses to certain stories and wager how far the audience is willing to go on dicier subjects, and determine if they are clued in to subtle cues which set up jokes later in the set.

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Monte Knetter Aug 29, 2018

Today we pursue episodic happiness with a tenacious, if not illogical, commitment. Yet despite our attachment to it, the modern notion of happiness is rather novel.

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Greg Wilbur Aug 28, 2018

The following is adapted from a talk I gave at the Convocation service at Greyfriars Classical Academy in North Carolina.

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Joshua Gibbs Aug 27, 2018

A brief address to the student body on the subject of our daily prayer and hymn-singing, which the upper school performs first thing every morning. 

How many of you have been to a wedding, a funeral, or a memorial service in the last several years?

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Camille Goldston Aug 27, 2018

Someone recently told me that I'm practical. I’m not sure exactly what that meant, but it provoked my thinking, because that was probably true. But I’m also wildly impractical in some ways, because I love and work in classical education. That work is all about spending two decades on an education that teaches people to know and love what is true and good and beautiful. It spends a lot of years on an education that doesn’t have anything to do with job training!

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Jacob Douvier Aug 24, 2018

I would like to talk about feasting. Particularly, I would like to talk about the role feasting plays in being human and how it reminds us of several important truths about reality. These truths are at odds with the prevailing wisdom of our age—the sophistry of the calculators who believe that human beings are simply biological machines whose lives ought to be measured against how closely they compare with an assembly line: What do they get done? How quickly did they do it?

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Lindsey Brigham Knott Aug 23, 2018

Four chapters into our latest read-aloud, The Scarlet Pimpernel, the ninth-grade student whom I was tutoring spontaneously commented, “This is a really good story . . . it keeps you wondering what’s about to happen!” Heartily assenting, I turned the page to begin the next chapter of mounting mystery. But hours later, having left behind the novel’s Parisian streets and English inns, that comment echoed within the very different setting of my twenty-first century suburban preoccupations and pronounced an epiphany to my hard-hearing ears. 

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Greg Wilbur Aug 23, 2018

Felix Concordia means “successful harmony”—a way to look at nature and arts through the lens of the quadrivium.

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