Lindsey Brigham Knott Jun 11, 2018

“Kids can smell morals. And they smell like Brussels sprouts.”

That line summarizes, more pithily than most, the general attitude towards “preachy children’s books” reflected in a cursory Google search. It comes from an article by a published author giving tips for writing children’s books, and most articles of that sort seem to include, fairly high on the list, the admonition to avoid preachiness at all cost. 

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Adam Andrews Apr 28, 2017

In 1939, Marjorie Rawlings helped a whole nation of readers imagine that they were young country boys just coming of age. Her Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Yearling told the story of Jody Baxter, whose family ekes out a living in the central Florida scrubland of the late 19th century. Jody’s loss of innocence and search for friendship gave America a glimpse of its own struggle to survive the Great Depression and find fellowship in the midst of suffering. It resonates today with the same power, regardless of our country’s changing circumstances.

David Kern Mar 6, 2017

It's March, which means it's time for March Madness, which means it's time for a new CiRCE literature bracket! This year, we've pitted some of the greatest examples of children's literature up against each other. Thirty-two great children's books, five rounds, all leading to one champion. Or at least one most-favorite book? Either way, there's some hard choices ahead. Best to gear up. 

You can vote here. 

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Brian Phillips May 27, 2015

C.S. Lewis once remarked, “I am almost inclined to set it up as a canon that a children’s story which is enjoyed only by children is a bad children’s story.  The good ones last.  A waltz which you can like only when you are waltzing is a bad waltz.” 

Reading the great fairy tales and classic stories to our children remains a great responsibility for all parents. 

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