Austin Hoffman Jul 22, 2019

“Despair is for those who see the end beyond all doubt,” Gandalf cautions the men, elves, and dwarves (and hobbits) who have gathered to discuss Mordor’s activity and the revelation of the One Ring. While Sauron gathers orcs and evil men to himself, in a stroke of fortune they hold the Enemy’s great Weapon. The gathering is divided between two possible strategies: they will either use the Ring’s power to conquer the Dark Lord, or they will destroy it in Mount Doom’s fire.

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Danny Breed Apr 12, 2019

“Cinderella” is neither an allegory nor a gospel story, yet as with all of creation, it reveals aspects of the gospel story in various ways. Just as creation reveals God’s divine nature and eternal power, this tale reflects particular experiences of the universal church that manifest God’s dealings with the church. Within this beloved fairy tale, we see a picture of the endurance, favor, and rescue of the universal church.

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Samuel Postell Jul 30, 2018

Herman Melville’s Moby Dick is the only book in which the author writes what cannot be written. The book is highly experiential, arguably to the point of superfluity. Among my students, the whaling chapters are those which push them to give up the fight. For myself, my first copy of Moby Dick was burnt upon Ishmael’s description of the Italian paintings of Christ wherein the narrator claims that they are most accurate because they capture the “hermaphroditical” character of the Son.

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Jon Buell Dec 12, 2017

We have all witnessed the curious, silly, emotional roller coaster that is a “logic-stage” student. They can be so fun and so full of wonder, and yet so disobedient at the same time. One minute we are in awe of their thoughts and abilities and the next we are pulling our hair out in frustration.

We have all been logic students. You may have taught and even raised logic students.

But have you ever worshiped a logic student?

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Andrew Kern May 31, 2017

When our Lord was crucified and buried, the disciples were traumatized and frightened beyond the imagination of the suburban American writing this post.

When He ascended into heaven, however, they were not sad or frightened. We learn mostly from Luke that they returned to Jerusalem rejoicing, that they “were continually in the temple praising and blessing God,” and that they went up into the upper room where they “continued together with one accord in prayer and supplication.” 

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Andrew Kern May 9, 2013

I Corinthians 1-3 is a remarkably helpful passage for us when we want to understand the place of education for the Christian. It also helps us interpret other passages that are a little more difficult on first encounter. 

Let me try to illustrate that conviction by reading John 3 in light of some things I think I've seen in I Corinthians 1-3. 

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