Lindsey Brigham Knott May 26, 2020

There come times when a thing you’ve known time out of memory suddenly opens before you, blossoms into beauty where you’d never known to seek it. These are times of transfiguration, and in their witness to both the humble hiddenness of beauty and the deep meaningfulness of reality, they refresh our faith in a world where “being indoors each one dwells” and in a Christ who “plays in ten thousand places,” as Hopkins exulted. 

The other day I read a passage that opened one of these times for me. It had to do with, of all things, parts of speech. Here it is:

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Andrew Kern Apr 10, 2020

Language use is in decline, has been for over a century, and is not going to turn around in the next century. So what to do about it when the kid in front of you (and you too!) is (are?) part of that decline?

Be patiently diligent to awaken him or her to the nature, purpose, power, and beauty of language. 

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Andrew Kern Dec 14, 2016

Among the most profound mistakes of our era, I am convinced we would have to list the shift from the liberal arts to subjects in our schools. 

If you teach subjects, one of the many unfortunate things that happens is that students quickly catch on that there is content (i.e. information to be remembered) in this subject. If they like it, they will pay attention, if not, you need something else to get them to do so. 

Tests will do, thank you very much. But that's only one of the myriad ways teachers are taught to manipulate the students affections and minds. 

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Matthew Bianco Dec 2, 2016

What is rhetoric? You’ve probably heard or thought of rhetoric as the art of persuasion. Fans of Aristotle will probably think of it as the art of finding the available means of persuasion. If you follow in the vein of Quintilian, you will probably think of it as the art of persuasion toward truth (and goodness and beauty). For those of you who have heard Andrew Kern speak on the topic, you’ve probably picked up something along the lines of rhetoric being the art of decision-making in community. One of these is decidedly not like the others.

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Josh Mayo Oct 3, 2014

Have you ever encountered a paragraph that itself was worth the price of the book? I did while reading Dr. Scott F. Crider’s The Office of Assertion. Here it is, linguaphiles (for free!):

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Andrew Kern Apr 12, 2014
Every English school child in Elizabethan England memorized the famous “Lily’s Grammar.” Even earlier, Dean Colet had re-founded St. Paul’s school in London, where he implemented a curriculum and text books written and assisted by his friend, Desidarius Erasmus. By the time Shakespeare reached the Stratford Grammar School in 1571, the curriculum and methods of St. Paul’s had spread throughout England. Sister Miriam Joseph describes the manner of teaching:
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