Lindsey Brigham Knott Aug 1, 2019

The English language is a minefield of buried metaphors. Take “buried metaphor,” for instance. Standard dictionary definitions treat the phrase as an abstract term, defining “buried metaphor” as a word or phrase that, though originally intended  as a figure of speech, has been used so frequently that it now represents a specific concept without the figurative connotation. 

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David Kern Feb 11, 2015

In his recent book, Ten Ways to Destroy the Imagination of Your Child, Dr. Anthony Esolen, a noted literature professor and translator of Dante’s Divine Comedy, wrote this:

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Joshua Leland Jan 30, 2014

Reading is really quite mysterious. We take it for granted, but the fact that a series of scrawled symbols and shapes stained on a piece of paper can transport us into the mind of another human being is rather magical. But I've also become aware that there are different kinds of reading, or different ways of reading.

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David Kern Nov 12, 2013

I woke to the smell of bacon and coffee, familiar and pleasant and full of the promise of a new adventure. Rolling out of my sheet, I tossed my legs to the floor and dragged my boots towards me with my right foot. I slipped into the jeans draped over the foot of the bed and put the boots on. A crooked, bent white hat hung from the bed post, a red and white flannel draped beneath it. I slung the hat cockeyed onto my matted hair and quickly buttoned the shirt. The gun, a fully loaded white handled revolver, rested under my pillow.

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Joshua Leland Aug 29, 2013

A Footnote to All Prayers
by C.S. Lewis

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Ross Betts Aug 21, 2013

In the present age, an education in experimental science is an important and necessary feature for  students; however, the Classical Christian Education movement recognizes the shortcomings of an education whose principal concern is teaching science and technology. The human dimension is often lacking from a predominantly scientific program. A proper education attends to the moral imagination of students, drawing from traditional and classical sources.

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Angelina Stanford Apr 12, 2013

In his classic work, Economics in One Lesson, New Deal-era economist Henry Hazlitt critiques modern liberal economic theory. His analysis is interesting and extremely relevant to the current debate surrounding our own economic crisis. Why do the liberal economists win the day? How do they succeed in convincing people that government intervention in the economy will work—despite so much evidence to the contrary?

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