David Kern Feb 8, 2018

We often get asked about the best books on education. So I asked around the office a bit. Here's what some of the folks on our team had to say. 

 

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Cindy Rollins Oct 7, 2016

One of the hardest things about getting older is the decreasing time ahead of you to catch up on reading. Even reading one hundred books a year for the next twenty years is not going to do it. I feel about my To-Be-Read pile as my husband does about the salaries of major league baseball players. He would have to work for one hundred and fifty  years or more to make what some of those guys make in one year. It is not a hopeful thought.

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Cindy Rollins Jun 30, 2016
When you get to my age your “To Be Read List” becomes an insidious beast mocking you every time you walk from one room to another, laughing scornfully as you frantically look from pile to pile, bookshelf to bookshelf. A sneaky voice sounding for all the world like Worm Tongue reminds you every time you see a book that you are not getting any younger. Time is running out.
 
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Cindy Rollins Nov 23, 2015

It is starting to get cold again which means it is reading (and gift-giving) season. And the perfect Christmas gift is a book to curl up with during that long, lugubrious week between Christmas and New Year’s. 

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Lindsey Brigham Knott Sep 8, 2015

We humans are story-shaped and story-making creatures. From stories we receive the gifts of meaning, hope, purpose, revelation—even, in that great Story, salvation. A life without story is no human life.

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Cindy Rollins Jul 6, 2015

In a post on my old blog (the now defunct ordo-amoris.com) I wrote about how we are failing to give our boys a reason to learn, how boys are motivated by honor and how our society has left them without hope, and how one antidote to the problem may be using great literature to motivate our sons to pursue honor. 

But what books should they read?  

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Lindsey Brigham Knott May 21, 2015

The most effective way to shape our students’ epistemologies is to take them to used bookstores.

An overstatement, surely—but worth considering. Epistemological formation, or instruction in how we know what we know, must be a central pursuit of Christian education, for Pilate’s question has echoed down through two millennia and the reverberations of the three words “What is truth?” are now louder than Poe’s tintinnabulating bells. The whole history of philosophy anno Domini could be cast as a sustained attempt to answer them.

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David Kern Feb 24, 2015

We classical educators are well known for our love of books. Whether it's the good old-fashioned hard cover book that smells like moth balls and winter sweaters or a brand-new e-reader that keeps our spouses up at night, we tend to consume literature of all kinds like children consume candy on Easter. Many of us consider our libraries to be our most prized possessions and take seriously who will receive our favorite books when we die. So we thought, why not bring back our Question of the Week feature with a nod to this affection for the written word. 

Brian Phillips Jul 30, 2014

Eugene Peterson, long-time evangelical pastor, author, and professor, recently released his memoir The Pastor.  Early in the work, he describes his childhood in Montana, with stories of bullies, eccentric relatives, and working in his father's butcher shop.  Among his formative memories, Peterson includes his fondness for The Carnegie, the town library.  

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Chuck Hicks Jun 30, 2014

The list of excellent volumes on U.S. history is endless, but here are five that speak to classical visions of order and/or the efficacy of the humane tradition.

 

A Better Guide Than Reason, by M.E. Bradford

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