Lindsey Brigham Knott Oct 20, 2017

Probably, when your little child catches the flu and lies in bed, shivering and miserable, and asks you why she hurts so, you tell her that she caught a playmate’s germs, and they made her sick. Probably, this answer does not do much to console or to satisfy either of you, though you both accept it as truth.

Probably, it does not cross your mind to tell your little child that bad, mean fairies made her sick. Probably, if that answer did escape your lips, she would be intrigued. You, on the other hand, would feel the discomfort of telling an untruth. But would you be?

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Joshua Leland Apr 4, 2017

Over the many years of my education, I have found that the most exciting, interesting, and helpful things that I have learned is simply what words mean. We intuit the meaning of many words through context and common usage and avid readers will have a whole storehouse of words in their imagination from a young age whose meaning they can sort of explain based on the context of the book or sentence it came from, but when asked to actually explain the word they will be hard pressed to give a solid, satisfactory definition.

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Jon Jordan Oct 11, 2016

Our youngest son is just now beginning to communicate vocally. His older sister is forming sentences and learning new words every day, but we are just as pleased with the occasional grunt or squeal we get out of him. On one level, we are excited because this means that he is developing normally—something we never want to take for granted. But on an entirely different level, it also means that each day we are closer to hearing him describe his world in a way that we can understand. He is slowly learning to use his words.

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Andrew Kern Aug 11, 2016

If you want to learn a foreign language, the first thing you should do is start when you are under four years old, when everything is new and you just take it for granted that this is so. 

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David Kern Sep 17, 2013

Yesterday we posted an article by one Mr. Andrew Kern in which the author attacks progressive education for the way it teaches children to read. He claims that "...when we teach reading, we treat the child like she is a mechanism learning a process. We do not teach it like she is a person interacting with ideas." And then this: 

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Andrew Kern Sep 16, 2013

I was watching a bit of Brannagh’s Hamlet tonight and luxuriating in the language (some of which I understood) when my dear wife asked me for my opinion: “Do you think the groundlings actually understood what was going on in those plays?”

I said I thought they did (but that's probably a subject for another blog post).

Then she asked for another opinion: Why do you think people today can’t understand it?

I must warn you, I’m about to say something that will sound caustic. You probably want to cover your children’s ears while you read this.

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Cindy Rollins Jun 12, 2013

Words matter. This is the lesson of Christian classical education. This is the logos of John 1. This is where there is love. It's why I sometimes get alarmed.

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