David Kern Aug 25, 2017

Earlier this month we shared some reflections from teachers we trust on the habits that every great teacher displays. Now we want to flip that around, so we asked around to find out about the habits that every great student displays. Here's what we found out. 

***

Category:
David Kern Aug 7, 2017

As the new school year encroaches upon the last, lingering days of summer, it's easy to be overwhelmed at the prospect of new lesson plans and new students, at long days and assessments galore. It's easy to get bogged down in the minutia of planning to teach, thus losing sight of the big picture. So to help us focus, I asked some of our expert-teacher friends what habits all great teachers display. Here's what they said:  

Category:
Joshua Leland Jun 6, 2017

I'd like to broach the topic at hand by pointing to a poem that articulates the deep sorrow and ache of the Modern Man: William Wordsworth's critique of the world caused by the Scientific Revolution, "The World is Too Much With Us.”

Category:
Lindsey Brigham Knott Apr 14, 2017

Amidst the whirling weeks of the year, Good Friday dawns and demands attention. Christ’s words—“do this in remembrance of Me”—ring still in our ears from their reading Maundy Thursday, and we feel the struggle of slowing to remember anything when days are packed so full and pass so swiftly; even the long discipline of Lent may not have fully quieted our hearts. We want to remember, we long to grieve so that we may rejoice come Sunday—but how? 

Category:
David Kern Mar 15, 2017

For part one of this dialogue please click here. This is part two. It’s been edited slightly for clarity and length. 

Category:
David Kern Mar 13, 2017

According to Rod Dreher an end is nigh. A flood is coming in the form of a new secular Dark Age,  “There are people alive today,” he writes in his new book, The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation, “who may live to see the effective death of Christianity within our civilization.”  

Category:
Joshua Gibbs Mar 3, 2017

Editor's Note: Created and written by Peter Morgan (the award-winning screenwriter of The Queen), The Crown, an original drama from Netflix about the life and times of Queen Elisabeth II, has become something of a smash-hit, a success with critics and viewers alike. Rich with resplendent detail, magnificent performances, and the pathos offered by real-life, it's a moving tribute to one of the seminal figures of our times. It's respectful but avoids pandering, honest without being indulgent, and dramatic while avoiding undue embellishment.

Category:
Rebecca Weddle Feb 20, 2017

***

From its first drenching wave of sound, Max Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy sweeps the listener into the brooding, lonely landscape of E flat minor, and to a musical world in which the seeming exaggerations of dramatic melody unfurl a clearer picture of reality.

Category:
Emily Brigham Jan 31, 2017

***

What’s the difference between a violin and a fiddle? That’s one of the most frequently-asked questions about my instrument, and the answer is: not much, and a whole lot. Once upon a time, the instruments differed slightly in form. But nowadays, the difference lies in the sound and the culture, as Jem Finch, from To Kill a Mockingbird, knew well, and as I’ve discovered:

Category:
Bret Saunders Jan 24, 2017

It is not hard to sympathize with Simone Weil’s famous claim that “the true hero . . . of the Iliad is force.” The Prologue announces the action of the poem to be Achilles’s “wrath” and its repercussions, which include myriad d’algea—a “myriad of pains”—heaped on the heroes. And there are, indeed, a myriad of ways to die in the Iliad. You can be eviscerated, brained, decapitated, or crushed. You can get stabbed, sliced, shot, or rock-pounded from any angle.

Category:

Pages