Andrew Kern May 2, 2013

According to the Jewish and therefore Christian tradition, God created the heavens and the earth by speaking it into being. When He did so, He made something other than Himself. 

This is one of the most important things the Bible teaches, along with the Trinity, the Incarnation, and the death and resurrection of Christ. 

Category:
Brian Phillips Apr 25, 2013

St. Matthew composed his gospel primarily for the Jews of his day.  In all likelihood, Matthew was a despised man.  He was a tax collector (Matt. 9:9), which garnered as much admiration then as now.  Both his Greek name (Matthew, which means “gift of Jehovah”) and his Hebrew name, Levi (Mark 2:13-14, Luke 5:27-28) rooted him in Jewish heritage.  Yet, there he was, a Jew working for the Roman government.

Category:
David Kern Apr 24, 2013

As any high school English teacher can attest, the vast majority of today's young people would prefer to read contemporary (read: modern) literature rather than the classical and traditional works we're assigning. Regrettably, many of them would rather read The Hunger Games than The Iliad and Twilight rather than Romeo and Juliet. This is neither surprising nor new. But it's a problem against which we as teachers must brush daily. So with that in mind our question of the week is this: 

How modern is too modern? 

Category:
Matthew Bianco Apr 24, 2013

I teach a group of homeschooled 12th graders. This is my second year teaching them, having followed them from 11th to 12th grade. I introduced them to The Lost Tools of Writing Level 1 at the beginning of the 11th grade and we’ve continued the lessons into this second year.

Category:
Joshua Sturgill Apr 24, 2013

A friend and father of three recently asked me about books and parenting. I asked if he could remember his own reading habits early in life, and I told him about my own.

Category:
Christopher Perrin Apr 18, 2013

I am sure that most of you, like me, have fought hard to overcome a perpetual desire to relax and procrastinate when important tasks loomed.  Those of you who have never battled with procrastination--well, your problems are obviously of another sort.  In college, I recall several who transformed the practice of putting things off into art.  Do you remember the guy in your dorm hall who wouldn't begin his term paper till the night before it was due--and somehow still got an A?  These types make it tempting for all of us.

Category:
Andrew Kern Apr 17, 2013

As I have worked with and observed schools over the past twenty years, I have become ever more concerned about the degree to which the infinite and immortal souls of the children who attend them are treated as tertiary matters (maybe, at a good school, secondary) by the school leadership. What keeps leaders up at night seems to be whether enough parents will enroll their students to pay for the building program or whether the bills will be paid. 

Category:
Andrew Kern Apr 16, 2013

I may as well admit that I didn't like the Iliad very much the first time I read it. It was Samuel Butler's translation and while it moves fairly quickly and is interesting, he didn't seem to have the music of Homer in his voice. Others like this translation very much, so I won't say anything more than that it didn't do much for me when I was a young reader. 

Category:
Cindy Rollins Apr 16, 2013

In a few days my 3rd son will be graduating from college.

Category:
Angelina Stanford Apr 12, 2013

In his classic work, Economics in One Lesson, New Deal-era economist Henry Hazlitt critiques modern liberal economic theory. His analysis is interesting and extremely relevant to the current debate surrounding our own economic crisis. Why do the liberal economists win the day? How do they succeed in convincing people that government intervention in the economy will work—despite so much evidence to the contrary?

Category:

Pages