Molly Rychener Aug 3, 2018

“A door had shut, the low door in the wall I had sought and found in Oxford; open it now and I should find no enchanted garden.” —Brideshead Revisited

This line is one of the saddest I have ever read. My heart feels pierced for poor Charles Ryder at losing his enchantment! I’ve been thinking about this line for days now. Do we naturally lose our enchanted garden as we get older? Are the doors to the enchanted garden fewer in number? Do we forget to look for the “low door in the wall”? What do the doors look like now? Where do I start looking?

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Monte Knetter Aug 1, 2018

A cursory glance at the news seems to indicate that support for traditional liberal rights is waning. For example, half of our young people support banning hateful or offensive speech. Yet while support for traditional rights diminishes, there seems to be growing support for emerging rights, like transgender bathrooms.

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Samuel Postell Jul 30, 2018

Herman Melville’s Moby Dick is the only book in which the author writes what cannot be written. The book is highly experiential, arguably to the point of superfluity. Among my students, the whaling chapters are those which push them to give up the fight. For myself, my first copy of Moby Dick was burnt upon Ishmael’s description of the Italian paintings of Christ wherein the narrator claims that they are most accurate because they capture the “hermaphroditical” character of the Son.

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Jessica Deagle Jul 27, 2018

There's Brideshead, Howards End, and Scarlett’s Tara. Even Mary Lennox wanted her own little piece of earth from Mr. Craven’s vast holdings. Literature is full of a love for the lands and places we live in and the effects they have upon us, calling us back to them again and again. In a sense, they become our identity and our salvation. It's a beautiful motif and it speaks to my heart, yet its words may prove deceptive, in a way, if I am not careful to interpret what they say with a Kingdom mindset and long for more.

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Danny Breed Jul 25, 2018

Have you considered that the natural relationship children have with their environment greatly affects their education? God has woven into each child a particular way of relating to the things around him or her. If we don’t understand this relationship, then we may be inadvertently miseducating our children.

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Jeffrey Wald Jul 23, 2018

He writhes his body, arching his head back and rubbing his feet together. “It’s too hard,” he proclaims. “I can’t do it!”

Immediately, I want to lash out, “Too hard for you?! Too hard for you!? No, it’s not too hard for you. It’s too hard for me! I can’t teach you! Just read the silly prose! It’s not difficult! See: The cat sat on the floor.”

But thankfully, most days I am able to hold in my frustration and simply sit silently, pointing to the first three-letter word printed there, or almost calmly respond, “It’s OK son, I know you can do it.”

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Christine Norvell Jul 20, 2018

Recently our entire high school of 125 students and a handful of teachers saw Thornton Wilder's play Our Town at a local university, free I might add. For a play written in 1938, it was indeed a snapshot of its time, approaching mid-century America post World War I and the Great Depression. After the country had seen so much loss of life (and quality of life), it was no wonder that a certain hopelessness invaded the story. In essence, Wilder simplistically depicted the passing of time in the place and people of Grover's Corner, Americana. Yes, Americana.

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Zachariah Rosenbaum Jul 16, 2018

Being 17 years old, one might think that I would not have much to say in favor of education. In fact, I am certain that many people who will read this article assume that I would prefer to spend my time bashing the school system from my social media outlets and blog. However, in writing this article I intend to do just the opposite.

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Aaron Ames Jul 13, 2018

It should be of urgent concern that the meaning of the English word “belief,” an indispensable lens for both the confession of faith and cultivation of wisdom, has profoundly evolved. In his work Faith and Belief, Wilfred Cantwell Smith outlines this dilemma:

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Kate Deddens Jul 11, 2018

Allow me to tell you The Fable of the Fearsome √2, a proud irrational number with an unsettlingly sinister story behind it.

Feel free to share this story with the little children whom you tuck in. Please note that this is, like any respectable fairytale, the stuff of legend. Furthermore, as is a storyteller’s prerogative, I’ve taken a few minor liberties—mostly with respect to vocabulary—in retelling the legend.

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