Jessie Smith Oct 28, 2021

Recently my husband and I purchased 35 acres of land. Most of the land is wooded, but around the woods paths cut into the landscape. I adore walking down these trails. Every time I visit I look to see what new wonders can be found. Are there fresh animal tracks today? Can I detect remnants of our neighbor, Mr. Bunny? I look for freshly ripened dewberries and observe the wildflowers cloaking the trails. Most of all, I bask in the growth of the plants: ostrich ferns, hydrangea bushes, fig-trees, and pear trees, to name a few.

Renee Mathis Sep 16, 2021

In part one of this series, we looked at relationship as a prerequisite to assessment. This friendship, whether between parent and child, teacher and student, or mentor and apprentice, can offer a rich environment for the cultivation of knowledge and skills, and ultimately wisdom and virtue. In part two, we considered the importance of response, the understanding that assessment is a two-way street and needs to be an interaction between both teacher and student. 

Carrie Eben Jun 30, 2021

I have a confession to make. I see a therapist. 

I began my therapy journey when I became a parent. For some reason, transitioning to parenthood at age twenty-six after four years of marriage rocked my world. I thought I was ready for the perfect baby boy I carried inside of me and delivered after victoriously enduring Y2K, but alas, I was not prepared for the new role as “mother.” 

Timothy Knotts Jun 21, 2021

“Yes, I am quite aware that the mere athlete becomes too much of a savage, and that the mere musician is melted and softened beyond what is good for him.”

“Yet surely, I said, this ferocity only comes from spirit, which, if rightly educated, would give courage, but, if too much intensified, is liable to become hard and brutal.”

May 6, 2021

Throughout this last year, I have enjoyed reading a variety of beautiful stories on the Daily Gathering; we read and discussed the story of a rabbit who desired to be real, a Mermaid who sought an immortal soul, and a cowboy who lassoed a tornado. These, and many other stories, have brought the participants into a world of fairies and giants, witches and kings, and wonder and joy; they have taught the students how to attend through imagination, narration, discussion, and comparison. 

Apr 29, 2021

Throughout this last year, I have enjoyed reading a variety of beautiful stories on the Daily Gathering; we read and discussed the story of a rabbit who desired to be real, a Mermaid who sought an immortal soul, and a cowboy who lassoed a tornado. These, and many other stories, have brought the participants into a world of fairies and giants, witches and kings, and wonder and joy; they have taught the students how to attend through imagination, narration, discussion, and comparison. 

Carreen Raynor Mar 23, 2021

My daughter, Alison, has always been voraciously verbal. Once, as a tiny two-year-old, she curled up next to me on the couch, insisting that I read my book aloud. When I obliged with lines from Virgil’s Aeneid, expecting her to sate her curiosity and wander away, she stayed. For about twenty minutes, we were two souls, spellbound—she by the poetry and I by her childlike allegiance to it.

Monique Neal Mar 11, 2021

PARENT: I would like my son to begin studying a foreign language. I am considering Latin or ancient Greek, but I am leaning more towards a modern language. I know you are studying and teaching ancient Greek; what are your thoughts?      

TEACHER: That’s great that you are considering ancient Greek and Latin! Why are you leaning towards a modern language? 

Alex Kern Nov 9, 2020

I once asked my godfather what poem I should memorise, and he told me, “Choose carefully because it will change the landscape of your soul.” 

Matthew Bianco Sep 8, 2020

"By gazing on and contemplating things in a regular arrangement and always in the same condition, that neither do nor suffer injustice among themselves, all disposed in order in accord with reason, they imitate these things and take on their likeness as much as possible. Or do you imagine there’s another way for anyone not to imitate whatever he dwells with and admires” (Republic, Book VI, 500c)?

We become what we behold, it is said. Which is, of course, a wittier and and more quotable way of saying what Socrates said above.

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