Angelina Stanford Jun 19, 2017

This post is part of a series called The Fellowship of the Inklings where I attempt to blog my way through reading The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings by Philip and Carol Zaleski.

 

It wasn’t until I finished grad school that I properly encountered the Inklings. Oh sure, I had read The Lord of the Rings and I knew about Narnia, and I think I may have even read a Lord Peter novel, but I had no idea of the larger implications of their work.

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Brian Phillips Jun 1, 2017

St. Benedict's Rule advises abbots to seek counsel from the monks under their charge whenever important decisions have to be made. “As often as anything important is to be done in the monastery, the abbot shall call the whole community together and himself explain what the business is; and after hearing the advice of the brothers, let him ponder it and follow what he judges the wiser course” (RB, 3.1).

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Andrew Kern May 31, 2017

When our Lord was crucified and buried, the disciples were traumatized and frightened beyond the imagination of the suburban American writing this post.

When He ascended into heaven, however, they were not sad or frightened. We learn mostly from Luke that they returned to Jerusalem rejoicing, that they “were continually in the temple praising and blessing God,” and that they went up into the upper room where they “continued together with one accord in prayer and supplication.” 

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Brian Phillips May 30, 2017

Peter Leithart’s survey of the Gospels, The Four, models what it means to read Scripture iconically – that is, paying attention to the images, connections, and echoes found throughout. In his chapter on St. John’s gospel, Leithart mentions, almost in passing, that one could view the book as a walk through the tabernacle. And upon close inspection, it seems clear that this is yet one more beautiful thread John weaves throughout his writing.

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Andrew Kern May 25, 2017

People don't rise from the dead very often, though it has happened a few times. They don't often ascend to heaven either, though, again, there are a few accounts of it happening. 

However, only once has anybody descended into hades, been raised from the dead, and then ascended into heaven in triumph, whence He could distribute the gifts of His triumph to His people.  

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Brian Phillips May 15, 2017

Right now, most schools are drawing to a close and headmaster needs for next year are known. Students can think of nothing but summer break (bursting through the front doors singing, "Schooooool's out for summer!"), and the teachers feel roughly the same, but more so. For school boards and other governing bodies, however, the work is just beginning. Those searching for headmasters will sort through resumes and CVs, host personal and Skype interviews, hold marathon meetings, and do their best to wisely fill the vacancies of their school. In other words, the search is on!

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Andrew Kern May 8, 2017

Christ is risen from the dead, having trampled down death by death, and upon those in the tomb He has bestowed life. 

In all the history of mankind, nobody has ever achieved what the Christ achieved during those three holy days from Good Friday through the new Pascha that He initiated when He was raised from the dead. 

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Brian Phillips May 2, 2017

Like Matthew, John begins his gospel at the beginning. Matthew’s gospel opens with the genealogy or the “genesis” of Jesus Christ and John opens with an even more direct reference to Genesis – “In the beginning…” John then adds that the Word was the Creator. The Word “was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him, and without him was not any thing made that was made” (1:1-5).

Christ is the New Creation, the One in whom all things are made new. Verse 4 echoes this – “In him was life, and the life was the light of men.”

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Brian Phillips Apr 25, 2017

In John 20, Mary Magdalene goes to Jesus’ tomb twice. The first time, she goes to anoint the body of Jesus (Mark 16:1), only to find the stone rolled back. Assuming that the enemies of Jesus had moved the body as one last insult, Mary ran to find the disciples, bringing Peter and John back with her.

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Brian Phillips Apr 10, 2017

Yesterday, the Church celebrated Palm Sunday, the commemoration of Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem, and the beginning of Holy Week – the final days of Christ on earth before His crucifixion. The event is recorded in all four Gospels – Matthew 21:1-11, Mark 11:1-10, Luke 19:29-38, and John 12:12-15 – and the event shares connections and echoes with several other passages as well.

Here is the Triumphal Entry as recorded in Matthew’s Gospel:

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