Author

Angelina Stanford

Angelina Stanford has an MA in English literature from the University of Louisiana, graduating Phi Kappa Phi, and has taught in various Christian classical classrooms for over 20 years.  She is currently teaching the Great Books online to high school students at the Harvey Center for Family Learning and recently joined the online faculty of the Circe Academy.  She’s also the co-star of the popular Circe podcast “Close Reads.”  She has a particular interest in myths, fairy tales, and understanding literature through the study of mythological archetypes and biblical typologies—as well as a mild obsession with the influence of Celtic fairy stories and Celtic Christianity on the development of British literature.  She also has a more than mild obsession with Wendell Berry.​​

Angelina Stanford Dec 14, 2012

Watching the SEC championship game a few weekends ago, I viewed a commercial in which the announcer assured me that bigger is better. He even implied that the statement is beyond debate: it is, he proclaimed, a self-evident fact!
Category:
Angelina Stanford Oct 11, 2012
When a culture rejects God’s standard of righteousness, it always replaces God’s law with some new law, some new standard of right and wrong.  And even while mocking and despising the morality of Christianity, the high priests of the new cultural morality will enforce those new laws with a zeal surpassing religious fanatics. In our day, the new moral code is simple: To love is good; to hate is bad.
Category:
Angelina Stanford Sep 10, 2012
William Shakespeare

Cover of William Shakespeare

Category:
Angelina Stanford Sep 10, 2012

Where did the concept of fantasy originate? For that matter where did the concept of fiction come from? Ancient man had sacred texts, but they certainly did not consider them “fantasy.”

According to Gene Veith, it was the Bible that made fantasy possible in the first place. While the Greeks emphasized imitation, the Bible emphasized creation. The universe is not an imitation but a creation out of nothing.  This concept helped to provide the conceptual basis for creating stories, fiction.

Category:
Angelina Stanford Sep 6, 2012

Another common objection of our day is that fairy stories and fairy tales in particular are scary and violent and are therefore unfit for children. 

Category:
Angelina Stanford Sep 4, 2012

There is no natural connection between the minds of children and fairy tales, states Tolkien.

Category:
Angelina Stanford Aug 31, 2012

This essay was presented as an essay at the 2011 CiRCE Conference. 

Category:
Angelina Stanford Jun 28, 2012
Dr. Carol Reynolds, in her program Exploring America’s Musical Heritage Through Art, Literature, and Culture, connects music and the arts to American history, culture, geography, and far more so that we can understand historical events with new eyes and new ears.
Category:
Angelina Stanford Jun 22, 2012
Andrew Kern once said that most reading lists are motivated primarily by pride.  School administrators, teachers, and parents hope to impress with long, intimidating reading lists. Our students read all of these great works of literature; therefore we are a good school.  Be impressed.
Category:

Pages