Author

Angelina Stanford

Angelina Stanford has an MA in English literature from the University of Louisiana, graduating Phi Kappa Phi, and has taught in various Christian classical classrooms for over 20 years.  She is currently teaching the Great Books online to high school students at the Harvey Center for Family Learning and recently joined the online faculty of the Circe Academy.  She’s also the co-star of the popular Circe podcast “Close Reads.”  She has a particular interest in myths, fairy tales, and understanding literature through the study of mythological archetypes and biblical typologies—as well as a mild obsession with the influence of Celtic fairy stories and Celtic Christianity on the development of British literature.  She also has a more than mild obsession with Wendell Berry.​​

Angelina Stanford Mar 12, 2018

In mythology and the epics we encounter three different female characters: the Muse, the Siren, and the Echo. But these three women are more than just characters; they are three distinct Voices, each singing a different song—some to destruction and some to life.

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Angelina Stanford Aug 8, 2017

This post is part of a series called The Fellowship of the Inklings where I attempt to blog my way through reading The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings by Philip and Carol Zaleski.

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Angelina Stanford Jul 4, 2017

This post is part of a series called The Fellowship of the Inklings where I attempt to blog my way through reading The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings by Philip and Carol Zaleski.

In the Prologue, the Zaleskis orient the discussion of the Inklings in exactly the same way that I do. They are speaking my language!

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Angelina Stanford Jun 19, 2017

This post is part of a series called The Fellowship of the Inklings where I attempt to blog my way through reading The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings by Philip and Carol Zaleski.

 

It wasn’t until I finished grad school that I properly encountered the Inklings. Oh sure, I had read The Lord of the Rings and I knew about Narnia, and I think I may have even read a Lord Peter novel, but I had no idea of the larger implications of their work.

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Angelina Stanford Jun 13, 2017

It’s not often that I pick up a non-fiction book and cannot put it down. But that’s exactly what happened when I started reading The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings by Philip Zaleski and Carol Zaleski.

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Angelina Stanford Jan 16, 2017

Last week I contemplated the cycle of Death and Rebirth in Nature and how it reflects that great spiritual reality of the Resurrection.  In particular I focused on how, in the Resurrection, God makes even Death itself beautiful. I’ve continued to meditate on this idea—the relationship between Christ’s defeat of Death and the cultivation of Beauty.

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Angelina Stanford Jan 10, 2017

Here we are in January. Winter is fully underway. Trees have passed from green to red to bare. Flowers are gone. Birds and animals have retreated. Even children stay inside.

The Winter—in theology, in liturgy, in poetry—has always represented Death. Every year the Creation itself plays out the story of our own lives. Fresh new life sprouts forth in Spring, followed by a vigorous, green, lively Summer. In the Autumn, things slow down and the green fades, finally giving up its life to the barren Winter.

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Angelina Stanford Oct 15, 2016

In That Hideous Strength, the final book in Lewis’ Space Trilogy, a recurring motif is the lure of the Inner Circle.  As usual, Lewis has profound insights into the all the ways we compromise our character and slide ever so slowly into evil—hardly even realizing that we are doing it.

I’ve been thinking about this theme as I prepare to teach That Hideous Strength again. And today I ran across this passage in Lewis’ The Weight of Glory, where he spells out explicitly the idea he is trying to show us in his novel:

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Angelina Stanford Oct 8, 2016

I was having a conversation with my sister recently and the talk turned to female friendships. I asked her if she had found a community of friends yet in her new hometown; in particular I wondered if she had found some women with which to connect. She said that she had met some ladies, but I could tell by the tone of her voice that she wasn’t entirely enthused.

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Angelina Stanford Oct 1, 2016

By definition a fairy tale has a happy ending. There is no such thing as a tragic fairy tale. If a tale ends in tragedy, it is not a fairy tale; it is a cautionary tale. And yet you may have read some “fairy tales” that don’t have happy endings. That’s because the author deliberately changed the fairy tale to a cautionary tale.

Fairy tales are literary versions of folk tales that have been around for centuries. Details change over time and across cultures, but the basic story line always remains the same—in particular, the happy ending remains consistent across every version.

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