Author

Andrew Kern

Andrew Kern is the founder and president of The CiRCE Institute and the co-author of the book, Classical Education: the Movement Sweeping America

Andrew Kern Oct 9, 2017

Everybody loves math when they know it. When they don't, they think they hate math. What they really hate is not knowing it. 

Everybody loves Bach's Mass in B Minor if they can hear it. When they can't, they think they hate Bach's Mass in B Minor. What they really hate is not being able to hear it. 

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Andrew Kern Aug 10, 2017

The following passage from 1 Corinthians 3 sits on a plaque over the door in my family room at home. 

Omnia enim vestra sunt
Vos autem Christi
Christus autem Dei

My friend Marc Hays had it specially burned for me to thank me for my role in the CiRCE apprenticeship, from which I was resigning when he gave it to me last summer. 

The words are from when Paul is summarizing his argument against division with the infantile Corinthian church. 

I have long revered this passage as a cure for Christian stoicism. 

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Andrew Kern Aug 8, 2017

Over the past year the angst of the previous decade that arose from the anxiety of the previous half-century has been condensed into a few books that explore how Christians should respond now that we are marginalized by our ever-more secular culture. 

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Andrew Kern May 31, 2017

When our Lord was crucified and buried, the disciples were traumatized and frightened beyond the imagination of the suburban American writing this post.

When He ascended into heaven, however, they were not sad or frightened. We learn mostly from Luke that they returned to Jerusalem rejoicing, that they “were continually in the temple praising and blessing God,” and that they went up into the upper room where they “continued together with one accord in prayer and supplication.” 

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Andrew Kern May 25, 2017

People don't rise from the dead very often, though it has happened a few times. They don't often ascend to heaven either, though, again, there are a few accounts of it happening. 

However, only once has anybody descended into hades, been raised from the dead, and then ascended into heaven in triumph, whence He could distribute the gifts of His triumph to His people.  

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Andrew Kern May 8, 2017

Christ is risen from the dead, having trampled down death by death, and upon those in the tomb He has bestowed life. 

In all the history of mankind, nobody has ever achieved what the Christ achieved during those three holy days from Good Friday through the new Pascha that He initiated when He was raised from the dead. 

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Andrew Kern Apr 1, 2017

For some years now I have been preoccupied with the temple and its many iterations and echoes throughout the Bible.

This preoccupation has only grown through the realization of what most people who read the Bible have known since early childhood: 

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Andrew Kern Jan 5, 2017

Freedom is a great practical thing, not an ideological idea.

When people rule you on the basis of their own authority, you are not a free person. This is just as true in the classroom, the office, or the shop as it is in Washington, DC or London.  

But how can that be prevented?

True freedom has everything to do with how behavior, work, and thought are measured. Where do the criteria arise? This is not as obscure a thought as it might seem. Whoever assesses you is your boss. So where do the standards of assessment come from? 

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Andrew Kern Dec 19, 2016

The fundamental task of a teacher, beyond all others (at the practical level), is to take something complicated and make it simple enough for students to apprehend at the level of his capacity.

But Darla Sowders is right, it doesn't come naturally. It requires genuine knowledge of the discipline being taught, love of the student, and an understanding of how people learn. Plus, a specific understanding of the student's readiness for a given lesson. 

None of these things are developed by a subject and/or text book approach to learning.

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Andrew Kern Dec 14, 2016

Among the most profound mistakes of our era, I am convinced we would have to list the shift from the liberal arts to subjects in our schools. 

If you teach subjects, one of the many unfortunate things that happens is that students quickly catch on that there is content (i.e. information to be remembered) in this subject. If they like it, they will pay attention, if not, you need something else to get them to do so. 

Tests will do, thank you very much. But that's only one of the myriad ways teachers are taught to manipulate the students affections and minds. 

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