Author

Kevin S. Krahenbuhl

Kevin S. Krahenbuhl is the Interim Director of the Assessment, Learning, & School Improvement Ed.D. Program, and Assistant Professor of Education at Middle Tennessee State University.
 

Kevin S. Krahenbuhl Oct 12, 2018

This is the final article exploring how cognitive science provides empirical support to the methods of a classical education through a series of six principles about learning. The last two articles can be found here and here. This culminating article seeks to extend learning applications.

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Kevin S. Krahenbuhl Oct 5, 2018

This is the fifth article in a series examining how cognitive science provides empirical support to the methods of a classical education through a set of principles about learning.

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Kevin S. Krahenbuhl Sep 28, 2018

This is the fourth article in a series on how cognitive science provides empirical support to the methods of a classical education. First, we outlined that learning takes time and reflection. Second, we noted that learning is most efficient when cognitive limits are respected.

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Kevin S. Krahenbuhl Sep 21, 2018

This is the third article in a series on how cognitive science provides empirical support to the methods of classical education. Having clarified some essential information about learning in the first and second articles, let us now shift into looking at specific principles that enhance learning. The first of these is that learning is most effective when a broad foundation is in place.

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Kevin S. Krahenbuhl Sep 14, 2018

In my first article in this series we explored benefits classical educators can derive from interacting with cognitive science. There we examined the first of six systematically constructed principles for learning: that learning takes time and reflection. So, what we are thinking about is the best barometer of what we have the potential to learn. However, that leads to a second, essential question: how much can we think about at any given time?

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Kevin S. Krahenbuhl Sep 7, 2018

I live in two very different worlds. On one hand, I am a father of four who supports and helps in the homeschooling of our children with a Christian and classical approach. On the other, I have spent my entire professional career in public education as a K-12 teacher and university professor. Perhaps because of this immersion into two very distinct settings, I have been able to bring them to bear on each other. I want to share in this short article one of the wonderful overlaps that few may have seriously looked at.

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