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Brian Phillips Nov 26, 2014

Here are a few of the noteworthy classical education stories circling the web this week:

The Effect of the Liberal Arts in Hong Kong

Dr. Gene Veith of Patrick Henry College gives us a glimpse into the power of a liberal arts curriculum.  “Today, the still-Communist Chinese are blaming the liberal arts curriculum in the schools of Hong Kong for the pro-freedom movement currently roiling that city, with the protests generally led by liberal arts students.”

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Brian Phillips Nov 25, 2014

Frank Boyden served as headmaster of Deerfield Academy for sixty-six years.  Arriving at the school in 1902, Boyden began his labors with fourteen students and a group of trustees that were less than inspired.  Shortly after arriving in town to begin his work, Boyden met one particular trustee who offered this encouraging assessment: “It’s a tossup whether the academy needs a new headmaster or an undertaker.”

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Devin O'Donnell Nov 25, 2014

Last time I wrote I considered how Jesus was, by contemporary standards, a bad teacher. His disciples didn’t always immediately “get it,” and at times his public lecturing seemed to drive away more students than it attracted. His ability to properly “motivate” students could potentially come under scrutiny as well. And Jesus seems quite content to leave behind a student or two in his teachings. Or what else does the phrase, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear,” mean? But obviously.

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Brian Phillips Nov 20, 2014

Here are a few of the noteworthy classical education stories circling the web this week:

Out of the Classroom: Parents Explore Home-schooling

This USA Today article highlights the tremendous growth of homeschooling in the United States by telling the stories of several diverse homeschool families. 

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Brian Phillips Nov 19, 2014

Film Fisher, my favorite site for movie reviews, runs a regular segment called “Undefended” in which they list the “best” of a category without defense or explanation. Simple and direct, it serves as a great debate-starter. Another site I frequent is hosted by Dr. George Grant –Eleventary. On it, he lists, not ten or twelve, but eleven of something – Chesterton quotes, must-eat-at restaurants in London, favorite books by dead authors, whatever.

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Joshua Simmons Nov 18, 2014

One of the unique features of the history curriculum at Regents School of Austin involves taking our entire junior class to Europe for 12 days every spring. This serves our school’s mission by giving students the opportunity to see and experience places that they have only been reading about during their classical education here.

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Josh Mayo Nov 17, 2014

As a teacher, I lately find myself going to the poets for professional development. I find that it’s the poets, not the pedagogy experts, who know the soul best, though why and how I’m not exactly certain. Perhaps teaching itself is a poetic endeavor; or perhaps poetry, in it’s ability to work directly on the affections, is the purest form of education. Whatever the case, I’m stuck on several lines from Robert Frost in an essay called “The Figure a Poem Makes”:

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Joshua Gibbs Nov 11, 2014

This lecture was originally given as a convocation to students at the start of the school year, though I've found that the onset of the second quarter (which I imagine most of us have now begun) sometimes warrants a pep talk about maintaining the good goals we have set out for ourselves. 

Danny Breed Nov 10, 2014

Did you realize that families, classrooms, and entire nations rise or fall based on a simple inclination?

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Richard Marsh Nov 4, 2014

Somewhere in a musty old box there is a photograph of me that makes me laugh every time I see it.

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